Enrich Your English through Ads

Advertisements are rich sources of idioms and they’re often fun to watch.  Take a look at this funny new Smirnoff advertisement starring actor Ted Danson and listen for these two idioms:

  • What’s that supposed to mean? – What are you saying?; I’m not sure I understand what you’re saying (note: sometimes said when you’re offended by what the person is saying)
  • regular Joe – an average person (note: also sometimes known as an ordinary Joe, Joe Sixpack or for women: an ordinary Jane, an average Jane)

Emoticons in Business English Communications :-) & Some Business English Idioms

Let’s look at extracts from this Wall Street Journal article on emoticons in the workplace
and then study five idioms in the story.

As emoticons pop up in workplace email, experts weigh in

In the span of a few years, emoji—the smiley faces, hearts, flags and other smemoticonall pictures installed in most smartphone, email and chat programs—have become ubiquitous in digital communication …

More than half of workers say they have used emoji to communicate at work, according to a recent survey … More managers than workers approved of emoji at work, a finding that reflects research showing that small, playful icons serve a surprisingly serious purpose in managing the emotional tone at work.

Jacqueline Whitmore, the author of a book on business etiquette, advises gauging the tone of office communications before sending an emoji to a colleague. Allowing higher-ups to send the first smiley and only using them with familiar colleagues are both good practices.

Ms. Whitmore says it is also important to consider the recipient. A small picture of a winking ghost may build fellow-feeling among colleagues, but may fall flat among clients.

To play it safe, the best emoji to send is a variation of the smiley face. To be avoided, in Ms Whitmore’s view: anything denoting anger or romance.  “Learn to communicate without them, and use them only as an enhancement,” said Ms. Whitmore. “When it doubt, leave it out.”

(The above is excerpted from a story from the Wall Street Journal with the headline Emoji at Work: Managing With a Wink and a 🙂, written by Dahlia Bazzaz)

The idioms

to pop up – to appear suddenly or unexpectedly

to weigh in – to give an opinion

higher-ups – those in senior positions in a company; the bosses

to fall flat – to fail; to not get the desired response

to play it safe – to be safe; to avoid risks

American College Slang & Idioms

College students in the USA can be very creative with their English. Going to college or university in the United States? Just want to learn how American college students speak these days? This lesson on college slang and idioms is for you!

Download the PDF mini e-book on American College Slang

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New Business English App – Business English Negotiations

Business English appJust released – Business English Negotiations, a new iOS app for iPad & iPhone! Do you want to be more effective when you speak English? Do you want to express yourself more clearly? Get what you want more often? Then you’ve found an app that will work for you! Introducing Business English Negotiations. Learn useful English vocabulary for negotiating successfully, resolving conflicts, and saying and getting what you want!

This app brings you:
•100+ of today’s most useful American English idioms & phrases
•Interactive exercises to reinforce the material
•Realistic scenarios complete with audio – a great way to improve your pronunciation!
•A built-in hangman game – you’ll have hours of fun playing while practicing your new vocabulary

Watch a video about this new app: Business English Negotiations app

Coming soon –appStoreIcon– two more apps in the Business English series: Business English You’re the Boss and Business English Sales and Strategy.